The reputation of Sgobba’s Monument Works is well-known throughout Northern New Jersey, and our work can be seen not only in cemeteries, but on public sites throughout the area.  Here are just a few of our favorite examples:

This tribute to boxing legend Joe Louis is 8 feet high and 4 feet wide and stands on the site of Doc Bier’s historic training camp in Pompton Lakes is a lasting tribute to the boxer Joe Louis. It is a unique memorial to such a fine sportsman and gentleman. (Photo: Top)

For decades, Memorial School in Woodland Park was lacking a fitting monument to the men and women who gave their lives in service to their country.  Today, the monument that we created reminds everyone that our safety and freedom comes at a price paid by others, and we honor them for all they have done. (Photo: Second from the Top)

Sgobba’s Monument Works is proud to have designed the Veteran’s Memorial for the Township of Wayne on Route 23.  This impressive memorial spanning more than 6′ high and 10′ wide is a fitting tribute to our war veterans and a shining example of what can be accomplished in granite style. (Photo: Third from the Top)

Lodi is home to the memorial that we created to honor our veterans wounded in combat in all wars.  Adorned with the Purple Heart, it stands as a reminder that it is not only our veterans who sacrificed their lives who deserve our respect and admiration.  (Photo: Bottom)

We created the memorials of the Vietnam, Korean, 1st, and 2nd World Wars that can be seen and admired on the campus of the Passaic County Vocational-Technical High School, also in Wayne Township. Fashioned of black granite, these memorials reflect etchings of local men and women in uniform as well as the various service branches in which they served.

Standing proudly before the municipal building in Fair Lawn is an impressive traditional war memorial over 7 feet tall and 12 feet wide. Inscribed there are the names of all Fair Lawn residents who gave their lives in defense of their country and the freedom we are all privileged to enjoy as citizens.

Cast in a batting pose, a lifelike bronze statue of baseball legend Larry Doby stands in Eastfield Park in Paterson. From the playgrounds in Paterson and the Negro Leagues of Newark, Larry Doby was drafted to the Cleveland Indians on July 5, 1947, becoming the American League’s first black player. This memorial, and so many others, stand as lasting tributes to the indomitable human spirit. They reflect the best of who we are and a timeless remembrance of what we can become.

We look forward to the next memorials that we will create to honor those who have served, and the accomplishments of others whose legacy deserves to be preserved.